Greg L. Bryan

Greg L. Bryan

Greg L. Bryan

Greg L. Bryan is a professor of astronomy at Columbia University and a co-leader of the galaxy formation group at the Simons Center for Computational Astrophysics. He received a Ph.D. in astrophysics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1996 and held positions at Princeton, MIT, and Oxford before joining the faculty at Columbia in 2004 and the Simons Foundation in 2016. He is a recipient of a Princeton Lyman Spitzer Fellowship, a Hubble Fellowship, an NSF CAREER award and the Leverhulme Trust Prize. His primary research focus involves the use of large-scale computational hydrodynamics and computational models to better understand astrophysical systems in a cosmological framework. He has applied such techniques to study the generation of large-scale structure in the universe, the formation of X-ray clusters, the evolution of galaxies and the birth of the first stars in universe. He has also carried out numerical simulations used to generate visualizations for the Oscar-nominated IMAX film Cosmic Voyage, as well as planetarium shows at the American Museum of Natural History. is a professor of astronomy at Columbia University and a co-leader of the galaxy formation group at the Simons Center for Computational Astrophysics. He received a Ph.D. in astrophysics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1996 and held positions at Princeton, MIT, and Oxford before joining the faculty at Columbia in 2004 and the Simons Foundation in 2016. He is a recipient of a Princeton Lyman Spitzer Fellowship, a Hubble Fellowship, an NSF CAREER award and the Leverhulme Trust Prize. His primary research focus involves the use of large-scale computational hydrodynamics and computational models to better understand astrophysical systems in a cosmological framework. He has applied such techniques to study the generation of large-scale structure in the universe, the formation of X-ray clusters, the evolution of galaxies and the birth of the first stars in universe. He has also carried out numerical simulations used to generate visualizations for the Oscar-nominated IMAX film Cosmic Voyage, as well as planetarium shows at the American Museum of Natural History.

Education

Ph.D., Astrophysics
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL