It from Qubit: Postdocs

Henry Maxfield

Henry Maxfield

Henry Maxfield is a postdoc at McGill University. Originally from the UK, he studied mathematics at Cambridge University for his undergraduate and master’s degrees before moving to Durham, where he received his Ph.D. in 2015, supervised by Veronika Hubeny. His research centers on understanding how and why calculations quantifying quantum information map to geometric problems in gravity. Much of his recent work focuses on gravity in three space-time dimensions, where many problems become more tractable.

Fernando Pastawski

Fernando Pastawski

Fernando Pastawski is a postdoctoral scholar at the Institute for Quantum Information and Matter (IQIM) in the research group of Professor John Preskill at California Technical Institute. He obtained his Ph.D. summa cum laude from the Ludwig Maximilian University, Germany, in 2012, working with Ignacio Cirac at the Max-Planck Institute for Quantum Optics (MPQ). For his doctoral work on quantum memories and applications, he was granted the Otto-Hahn medal by the Max-Planck society.

His research lies at the interface of quantum information and many-body physics. He has made important contributions in the area of quantum memory and quantum error-correcting codes, as well as characterizing the logical quantum gates that can be robustly implemented. He has also helped shed light on the classification of phases. Recently, he has introduced an explicit tensor-network-based family of quantum error-correcting code that embody the information theoretic structure of holography. Through the use of tensor network descriptions, he continues to pursue connections between quantum gravity and quantum information.

Douglas Stanford

Douglas Stanford

Douglas Stanford is a postdoc at the Institute for Advanced Study, in Princeton, New Jersey. He received his Ph.D. from Stanford University under the supervision of Leonard Susskind. His recent work has focused on the quantum properties of black holes and on chaotic dynamics in systems with many degrees of freedom. With Maldacena and Shenker, he proved a bound on many-body chaos that is saturated by black holes.

Brian Swingle

Brian Swingle

Brian Swingle is a member of the Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics working at the interface of quantum information, quantum matter and quantum geometry. Originally from Chattanooga, Tennessee, he graduated from Georgia Institute of Technology in 2005 with a B.S. in physics. He then obtained his Ph.D. from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2011 and was a Simons Fellow at Harvard from 2011 to 2014 before joining Stanford in fall 2014.

Swingle helped pioneer the idea that space-time can emerge from quantum entanglement and introduced the use of tensor networks in the study of quantum gravity. He has also made significant contributions to the study of entanglement in quantum matter. Currently, he is interested in experimental probes of the dynamics of quantum information and in the prospect of tabletop quantum simulation of black holes.

Beni Yoshida

Beni Yoshida

Beni Yoshida is currently a five-year senior postdoctoral researcher at Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics. He received his Ph.D. in physics in 2012 from Massachusetts Institute of Technology under the supervision of Edward Farhi and Peter Shor. Afterward, he was awarded the David and Ellen Lee Postdoctoral Scholarship in Theoretical Physics at California Institute of Technology (2012–2015) working in John Preskill’s group.

His research is focused on applications of quantum information theory to problems of quantum many-body physics. In particular, he has used the techniques of quantum coding theory to find novel topological phases of matter and developed a framework of classifying fault-tolerant logical gates by using topological gauge theories. More recently, he has become interested in black hole physics, trying to expand his horizons further.